Tour De France Soundtracks

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Tour De France Soundtracks by Kraftwerk

“Prologue”

“Tour De France 03 – Etape 1”

“Tour De France 03 – Version 2”

“Tour De France 03 – Etape 3”

“Chrono”

“Vitamin”

“Aero Dynamik”

“Titanium”

“Elektrokardiogramm”

“La Forme”

“Regeneration”

“Tour De France”

 

Electric Cafe

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Electric Cafe by Kraftwerk

“Boing Boom Tschak”

“Techno Pop”

“Musique Non Stop”

“The Telephone Call”

“Sex Object”

“Electric Cafe”

Computer World

NOTE: We’re looking for a knowledgeable Kraftwerk nerd! A review for Computer World hasn’t been published — yet. We need someone who can write a full track-by-track review of this album (at least a couple paragraphs per song); if you know the music, you can submit a review. You’ll be compensated when visitors make purchases through vendor links on their pages — for as long as your review remains on the site. Get more details in the FAQ.

Computer World by Kraftwerk

“Computer World”

“Pocket Calculator”

“Numbers”

“Computer World .. 2”

“Computer Love”

“Home Computer”

“It’s More Fun To Compute”

The Man-Machine

Kraftwerk, since 1974’s Autobahn, has been widely hailed as the most influential band for any form of electronic music, but their influence doesn’t stop there, not by any means. Listening to most artists who incorporated any kind of electronic equipment — which basically includes, um, nearly every artist that performed in the 1980s at the very least — you can detect some influence.

The Man-Machine (or, as it’s titled in Germany, Die Mensch-Maschine) was just as influential a record as their previous, but is much easier to get into. The album is a lot poppier, and even provided them with a #1 hit in the UK: “The Model”. It’s far less difficult than Autobahn or Trans-Europe Express for Kraftwerk neophytes, but is still a notch below those two.

This is a good album for getting into the band, but the two aforementioned are by far more recommended. Almost every song on The Man-Machine is very similar, with few exceptions. While this does mean the material is overall strong (Kraftwerk have always been the masters of their art), it does mean that interest may easily be lost.

The record came under fire because of its cover art; people accused Kraftwerk of Nazi intentions because of the visual style it took. Upon playing the album at any speed, however, no Nazi messages appear in the album itself.

The Man-Machine was issued in both English and German. This review uses the English-language version.

Kraftwerk — The Man-Machine: Track-by-track review

1. “The Robots”
Okay, for those of you who are searching Kraftwerk’s body of work for who they influenced, you can detect in this song sounds that would pop up on a few rock records in the next twenty years; identifiable are the keyboard passages from “Radio Clash” (by the Clash), “Dancin’ in the Street” (Van Halen’s cover on Diver Down) and even Midnight Oil’s “Return to Sender” (from their Redneck Wonderland album).

Regardless of this, “The Robots” sets the tone for what to expect on the album; cold, steady, synthesized rhythms, vocals processed heavily through a vocoder — often consisting of few words, and often difficult to understand. Consider this track a test: if you find this pleasurable, the album will appeal to you quite well. The mechanical sounds fit the subject matter very nicely. A commendable effort.

2. “Spacelab”
As with the following song, “Metropolis”, and as with the previous, “The Robots” — and as with most songs on the album, and indeed most in Kraftwerk’s whole discography — “Spacelab” is a soundscape, featuring just a few vocals here and there (the title, in a monotone, processed voice) to remind you of the subject matter at hand; as if it weren’t obvious that this was about something spacey from the soundscape. Otherwise it’s fairly nondescript and rather an average track.

3. “Metropolis”
A soundscape that evokes the scene of a large city from above quite effortlessly

The piece, again, contains few vocals; they consist merely of the title spoken in a deadpan voice, though here they sound distinctly less treated. Probably not one of the best tracks on the album but good nonetheless; it’s about average.

4. “The Model”
Quite a departure from the other songs on the album, this. This song takes on the actual structure of a song, and not a robotic soundscape. The lyrics are probably not direct translations of the original German, mind. As I understand it, the song is supposed to be rather sardonic, and I can only barely detect that… though, I suppose lines like “It only takes a camera to change her mind” are pretty obviously so. Some parts of the lyrics (especially the first verse) are pretty silly-sounding (which may have to do with the singer’s voice), but still work.

By the way, the vocals here are clearly not processed.

5. “Neon Lights”
A longer track, but similar again to everything but “The Model” on this album. It opens up with some vocals (about four lines repeated a few times) before going into a lengthy instrumental passage, one that’s significantly easier to get lost in. Maybe it’s because this is about thirty years later, but this doesn’t call to mind the imagery of neon lights for me; with its increasing-then-decreasing dynamics, it seems closer to really bad flickering fluorescent lights — though slowed down significantly. Regardless of what it’s supposed to be showing off, it’s an excellent track, one of the better songs on the album.

By the way, yes, U2 did cover this for their “Vertigo” single.

6. “The Man-Machine”
Here we are, the last song of the album, bringing back more of the robotic sounds heard on the first three tracks, and again with heavily-treated vocals. This one falls short of the first two tracks and, generally, most of the rest of the record. The vocals are mostly indecipherable, which also happened on “The Robots”. It’s not exactly a bad song, but it’s far from their greatest, and probably not the most favorable on the record.

Kraftwerk, since 1974’s Autobahn, has been widely hailed as the most influential band for any form of electronic music, but their influence doesn’t stop there, not by any means. Listening to most artists who incorporated any kind of electronic equipment — which basically includes, um, nearly every artist that performed in the 1980s at the very least — you can detect some influence.

The Man-Machine (or, as it’s titled in Germany, Die Mensch-Maschine) was just as influential a record as their previous, but is much easier to get into. The album is a lot poppier, and even provided them with a #1 hit in the UK: “The Model”. It’s far less difficult than Autobahn or Trans-Europe Express for Kraftwerk neophytes, but is still a notch below those two.

This is a good album for getting into the band, but the two aforementioned are by far more recommended. Almost every song on The Man-Machine is very similar, with few exceptions. While this does mean the material is overall strong (Kraftwerk have always been the masters of their art), it does mean that interest may easily be lost.

The record came under fire because of its cover art; people accused Kraftwerk of Nazi intentions because of the visual style it took. Upon playing the album at any speed, however, no Nazi messages appear in the album itself.

The Man-Machine was issued in both English and German. This review uses the English-language version.

Kraftwerk — The Man-Machine: Track-by-track review

1. “The Robots”
Okay, for those of you who are searching Kraftwerk’s body of work for who they influenced, you can detect in this song sounds that would pop up on a few rock records in the next twenty years; identifiable are the keyboard passages from “Radio Clash” (by the Clash), “Dancin’ in the Street” (Van Halen’s cover on Diver Down) and even Midnight Oil’s “Return to Sender” (from their Redneck Wonderland album).

Regardless of this, “The Robots” sets the tone for what to expect on the album; cold, steady, synthesized rhythms, vocals processed heavily through a vocoder — often consisting of few words, and often difficult to understand. Consider this track a test: if you find this pleasurable, the album will appeal to you quite well. The mechanical sounds fit the subject matter very nicely. A commendable effort.

2. “Spacelab”
As with the following song, “Metropolis”, and as with the previous, “The Robots” — and as with most songs on the album, and indeed most in Kraftwerk’s whole discography — “Spacelab” is a soundscape, featuring just a few vocals here and there (the title, in a monotone, processed voice) to remind you of the subject matter at hand; as if it weren’t obvious that this was about something spacey from the soundscape. Otherwise it’s fairly nondescript and rather an average track.

3. “Metropolis”
A soundscape that evokes the scene of a large city from above quite effortlessly

The piece, again, contains few vocals; they consist merely of the title spoken in a deadpan voice, though here they sound distinctly less treated. Probably not one of the best tracks on the album but good nonetheless; it’s about average.

4. “The Model”
Quite a departure from the other songs on the album, this. This song takes on the actual structure of a song, and not a robotic soundscape. The lyrics are probably not direct translations of the original German, mind. As I understand it, the song is supposed to be rather sardonic, and I can only barely detect that… though, I suppose lines like “It only takes a camera to change her mind” are pretty obviously so. Some parts of the lyrics (especially the first verse) are pretty silly-sounding (which may have to do with the singer’s voice), but still work.

By the way, the vocals here are clearly not processed.

5. “Neon Lights”
A longer track, but similar again to everything but “The Model” on this album. It opens up with some vocals (about four lines repeated a few times) before going into a lengthy instrumental passage, one that’s significantly easier to get lost in. Maybe it’s because this is about thirty years later, but this doesn’t call to mind the imagery of neon lights for me; with its increasing-then-decreasing dynamics, it seems closer to really bad flickering fluorescent lights — though slowed down significantly. Regardless of what it’s supposed to be showing off, it’s an excellent track, one of the better songs on the album.

By the way, yes, U2 did cover this for their “Vertigo” single.

6. “The Man-Machine”
Here we are, the last song of the album, bringing back more of the robotic sounds heard on the first three tracks, and again with heavily-treated vocals. This one falls short of the first two tracks and, generally, most of the rest of the record. The vocals are mostly indecipherable, which also happened on “The Robots”. It’s not exactly a bad song, but it’s far from their greatest, and probably not the most favorable on the record.

The Man-Machine by Kraftwerk

“The Robots”

“Spacelab”

“Metropolis”

“The Model”

“Neon Lights”

“The Man-Machine”

Trans-Europe Express

NOTE: We’re looking for a knowledgeable Kraftwerk nerd! A review for Trans-Europe Express hasn’t been published — yet. We need someone who can write a full track-by-track review of this album (at least a couple paragraphs per song); if you know the music, you can submit a review. You’ll be compensated when visitors make purchases through vendor links on their pages — for as long as your review remains on the site. Get more details in the FAQ.

Trans-Europe Express by Kraftwerk

“Europe Endless”

“The Hall Of Mirrors”

“Showroom Dummies”

“Trans-Europe Express”

“Metal On Metal”

“Franz Schubert”

“Endless Endless”

Radio-Activity

NOTE: We’re looking for a knowledgeable Kraftwerk nerd! A review for Radio-Activity hasn’t been published — yet. We need someone who can write a full track-by-track review of this album (at least a couple paragraphs per song); if you know the music, you can submit a review. You’ll be compensated when visitors make purchases through vendor links on their pages — for as long as your review remains on the site. Get more details in the FAQ.

Radio-Activity by Kraftwerk

“Geiger Counter”

“Radioactivity”

“Radioland”

“Airwaves”

“Intermission”

“News”

“The Voice Of Energy”

“Antenna”

“Radio Stars”

“Uranium”

“Transistor”

“Ohm Sweet Ohm”

Autobahn

NOTE: We’re looking for a knowledgeable Kraftwerk nerd! A review for Autobahn hasn’t been published — yet. We need someone who can write a full track-by-track review of this album (at least a couple paragraphs per song); if you know the music, you can submit a review. You’ll be compensated when visitors make purchases through vendor links on their pages — for as long as your review remains on the site. Get more details in the FAQ.

Autobahn by Kraftwerk

“Autobahn”

“Komtenmelodie 1”

“Komtenmelodie 2”

“Mitternacht”

“Morgenspaziergang”

Ralf And Florian

NOTE: We’re looking for a knowledgeable Kraftwerk nerd! A review for Ralf And Florian hasn’t been published — yet. We need someone who can write a full track-by-track review of this album (at least a couple paragraphs per song); if you know the music, you can submit a review. You’ll be compensated when visitors make purchases through vendor links on their pages — for as long as your review remains on the site. Get more details in the FAQ.

Ralf And Florian by Kraftwerk

“Elektrisches Roulette”

“Tongebirge”

“Kristallo”

“Heimatklange”

“Tanzmusik”

“Ananas Symphonie”

Kraftwerk 2

NOTE: We’re looking for a knowledgeable Kraftwerk nerd! A review for Kraftwerk 2 hasn’t been published — yet. We need someone who can write a full track-by-track review of this album (at least a couple paragraphs per song); if you know the music, you can submit a review. You’ll be compensated when visitors make purchases through vendor links on their pages — for as long as your review remains on the site. Get more details in the FAQ.

Kraftwerk 2 by Kraftwerk

“Klingklang”

“Atem”

“Strom”

“Spule 4”

“Wellenlange”

“Harmonika”

Kraftwerk 1

NOTE: We’re looking for a knowledgeable Kraftwerk nerd! A review for Kraftwerk 1 hasn’t been published — yet. We need someone who can write a full track-by-track review of this album (at least a couple paragraphs per song); if you know the music, you can submit a review. You’ll be compensated when visitors make purchases through vendor links on their pages — for as long as your review remains on the site. Get more details in the FAQ.Kraftwerk 1 by Kraftwerk

“Ruckzuck”

“Stratovarius”

“Megaherz”

“Vom Himmel Hoch”